Argo – A Movie Review

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Oct 282012
 

ARGO Movie PosterThe true story of the life-or-death covert operation to rescue six Americans, which unfolded behind the scenes of the Iran hostage crisis–the truth of which was unknown by the public for decades. In 1979, the American embassy in Iran was invaded by Iranian revolutionaries and several Americans are taken hostage. However, six manage to escape to the official residence of the Canadian Ambassador and the CIA is eventually ordered to get them out of the country. With few options, exfiltration expert Tony Mendez devises a daring plan: to create a phony Canadian film project looking to shoot in Iran and smuggle the Americans out as its production crew. With the help of some trusted Hollywood contacts, Mendez creates the ruse and proceeds to Iran as its associate producer. However, time is running out with the Iranian security forces closing in on the truth while both his charges and the White House have grave doubts about the operation themselves.

Release Date: October 12, 2012; MPAA Rating: R (for language and some violent images); Genres: Action/Adventure, Adaptation, Comedy, Drama; Run Time: 2 hours.

Director: Ben Affleck

Cast: Ben Affleck, Alan Arkin, John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, Taylor Schilling, Scoot McNairy, Rory Cochrane, Christopher Denham, Kerry Bishé, Kyle Chandler, Chris Messina,     Zeljko Ivanek, Titus Welliver.

Lay and me saw this movie last weekend. Continue reading »

The Campaign

 Culture, Entertainment, Fun Stuff, Movies  Comments Off on The Campaign
Sep 092012
 
Click to watch the trailer

Click to watch the trailer

When long-term congressman Cam Brady commits a major public gaffe before an upcoming election, a pair of ultra-wealthy CEOs plot to put up a rival candidate and gain influence over their North Carolina district. Their man: naive Marty Huggins, director of the local Tourism Center. At first, Marty appears to be the unlikeliest possible choice but, with the help of his new benefactors’ support, a cutthroat campaign manager and his family’s political connections, he soon becomes a contender who gives the charismatic Cam plenty to worry about. As Election Day closes in, the two are locked in a dead heat, with insults quickly escalating to injury until all they care about is burying each other. Because even when you think campaign ethics have hit rock bottom, there’s room to dig a lot deeper.

In Theaters: August 10, 2012; MPAA Rating: R (for crude sexual content, language and brief nudity); Genres: Comedy; Run Time: 1 hour 37 minutes

Director: Will Ferrell, Zach Galifianakis, Katherine LaNasa, Sarah Baker, Jason Sudeikis, Dylan McDermott, Brian Cox, Kate Lang Johnson, John Lithgow, Thomas Middleditch, Dan Aykroyd

Actors: Will Ferrell, Zach Galifianakis, Katherine LaNasa, Sarah Baker, Jason Sudeikis, Dylan McDermott, Brian Cox, Kate Lang Johnson, John Lithgow, Thomas Middleditch, Dan Aykroyd

Writers: Chris Henchy, Shawn Harwell

Lay and me went to see this film last night at Westshore. I was a little surprised he wanted to see it, but he generally likes movies with Zach Galifianakis, as do I. Fun fact, Galifianakis was born in North Carolina. The story is based in a North Carolina Congressional district, supposedly in the eastern part of the state.

Will Ferrel plays Cam Brady, the incumbent congressman, who has never lost a race because he’s never had to run against someone. That changes when two CEO’s (played by John Lithgow and Dan Aykroyd clearly spoofing the Kock brothers) hatch a scheme that involves buying the election for Marty Huggins, the Galifianakis character. Continue reading »

Bernie – A Movie Review

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Jul 272012
 

In the tiny, rural town of Carthage, TX, assistant funeral director Bernie Tiede was one of the town’s most beloved residents. He taught Sunday school, sang in the church choir and was always willing to lend a helping hand. Everyone loved and appreciated Bernie, so it came as no surprise when he befriended Marjorie Nugent, an affluent widow who was as well-known for her sour attitude as her fortune. Bernie frequently traveled with Marjorie and even managed her banking affairs. Marjorie quickly became fully dependant on Bernie and his generosity and Bernie struggled to meet her increasing demands. Bernie continued to handle her affairs, and the townspeople went months without seeing Marjorie. The people of Carthage were shocked when it was reported that Marjorie Nugent had been dead for some time, and Bernie Tiede was being charged with the murder.

Genres:  Comedy, Crime, True Story

Starring:  Jack Black, Shirley MacLaine, Matthew McConaughey, Brady Coleman, Richard Robichaux, Rick Dial

Director:  Richard Linklater

Me and Lay saw this movie a while back. I liked it a lot. He thought it was OK.

I grew up in a small southern town, and grew up in the funeral business (In fact, I was a funeral director myself for a while), so this was a must see movie. It feels like I knew these locals and have heard their sayings all my life. Story is told uniquely with humor, often subtly. Jack Black stole the show. He had the part down perfectly. I’ve met several of those type of funeral directors. Matthew McConaughey is Texas all the way. Bernie has received excellent reviews from the critics, and I think it has that special edge to it.

The story never dragged, and Matthew McConaughey was exactly like every DA in a small town and that wasn’t a stretch for him because he grew up in a not so small Texas town. Shirley McLain was also great. The real stars of this movie were the towns people. Go see this movie.

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Get Him to the Greek-A Movie Review

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Dec 122010
 

Aaron Green gets things done. The ambitious 24-year-old has been given a career-making assignment. His mission: Fly to London and escort a rock god to L.A.’s world famous Greek Theatre for the first-stop on a huge comeback tour. His record mogul boss, Sergio Roma, gives him one warning: “The artist is the worst person on Earth. Turn your back on him at your own peril.” British rocker Aldous Snow is a brilliant musician, but due to a bad break up and nose-diving career, has fallen off the wagon and is now a drunken disaster. Weary of “yes men” and scared he’s entered the “greatest hits” moment in his career, Snow’s in the midst of a nihilistic downward spiral. When he learns his true love, model/pop star Jackie Q, is in Los Angeles, Aldous makes it his quest to win her back–right before kick-starting his world domination. As the countdown to the concert begins, one innocent young man must navigate a minefield of London drug smuggles, New York City brawls and Vegas lap dances to deliver his charge safe and, sort of, sound–all while trying to remain faithful to his med student girlfriend. He may have to coax, lie to, enable and party with Aldous, but Aaron will get him to the Greek.

Genres: Comedy; Running Time: 1 hr. 49 min.; Release Date: June 4th, 2010 (wide); MPAA Rating: R for strong sexual content and drug use throughout, and pervasive language.

Starring: Jonah Hill, Russell Brand, Elisabeth Moss, Sean ‘Diddy’ Combs, Rose Byrne

Directed by: Nicholas Stoller

Me and Lay watched this via download several weeks ago. I’m just not getting around to reviewing it.

I will admit the previews just did not cause me to want to see this movie. It liked a lot sophomoric potty humor, and the concept seemed pointless and contrived. I have seen Jonah Hill in a some of supporting roles and found him amusing, was not very familiar with Russell Brand, and saw Sean Coombs (or Diddy, P. Diddy, whatever he calls himself these days) and though…another rapper who thinks he can act? But my Lay wanted to see this.

I was pleasantly surprised at how funny this film was. Hill plays mild-mannered record company employee Aaron Green, who, when put on the spot by his boss for a fresh idea, says he’d like to see his musical idol, rocker Aldous Snow (Brand) do a special concert at the Greek Theatre in L.A. The ensuing three-day trip to London to bring  Aldous “to the Greek” throws Aaron’s life, including his silly-sweet relationship with his doctor girlfriend (Elisabeth Moss), into turmoil. Aaron gets thrust headfirst into a world of sex, drugs, and (of course) rock ‘n roll, with the expected results. I could have done without some of the bodily fluids that were shown, but thankfully it was nowhere near as prevalent as it appeared to be in the previews (actually, I think all the big “gross-out” moments  in the trailer, which just doesn’t do the movie justice).

Of course, the highlight of the film is Aldous himself. Again, I’ve not seen that much of Brand, but this seems to be his role. He manages to make the sex-crazed, drug-addicted party boy Snow into a character that is (a little) sympathetic, if not likable. Hill is delightfully uncomfortable in his role as Aaron – when he’s not squirming and cringing at Snow’s antics, he’s being thrown into a world he is woefully unprepared for – with hilarious results. Coombs manages to hold his own among the more seasoned comedians as record company exec Sergio – the funniest scene of the film involves Sergio getting into a battle of fists, bottles, and whatever else is within reach with Aldous’ father, played by Star Trek TNG/Deep Space Nine alum Colm Meaney.

While there are a few uncomfortable moments (you’ll know them when you see them), Get Him to the Greek has a few laugh-out-loud moments, and  manages to surprise with just a twinge of heart. I’d say watch this movie.

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It's Kind of a Funny Story

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Nov 062010
 

What’s a 16-year-old boy doing playing music and table tennis with adult psychiatric patients – on a school day? It’s kind of a funny story… It’s @5:00 AM on a Sunday in Brooklyn. Craig Gilner is bicycling up to the entrance of a mental health clinic; this bright 16-year-old is stressed out from the demands of being a teenager. Before his parents and younger sister are even awake, Craig checks himself into Argenon Hospital and is admitted by a psychiatrist. But the youth ward is temporarily closed – so he finds himself stuck in the adult ward. One of the patients, Bobby, soon becomes both Craig’s mentor and protege. Craig is also quickly drawn to another 16-year-old displaced to the adult ward, the sensitive Noelle, who just might make him forget his longtime unrequited crush Nia. With a minimum five days’ stay imposed on him by the adult ward’s staff psychiatrist Dr. Eden Minerva, Craig is sustained by friendships on both the inside and the outside as he learns more about life, love, and the pressures of growing up.

Genres: Comedy, Drama and Adaptation; Release Date: October 8th, 2010 (limited); MPAA Rating: PG-13 for mature thematic issues, sexual content, drug material and language.

Starring: Keir Gilchrist, Emma Roberts, Viola Davis, Lauren Graham, Jim Gaffigan

Directed by: Ryan Fleck, Anna Boden

We went to see this a couple of weeks ago at the movie theater. “It’s Kind of a Funny Story” is an aptly titled film. It’s just a story, and it’s kind of funny. It’s more drama than comedy, and although it was slow, they really did drag me into the story. It stars Keir Gilchrist as Craig, a teenager who thinks about killing himself and seeks help. He finds help at a psychiatric ward.

Is Zach Galifianakis a doctor or a patient? Like Robin Williams in the beginning of “Patch Adams”, he blurs the line well. Here he delivers the same off-beat humour that we have come to expect from him. I was also quite impressed with Emma Roberts who plays a love interest for our teenage hero. They were all well written characters, and I found it very appropriate that they kept Roberts’ reasons for being in the psych ward concealed.

Lay did not like the movie, but I’ll never have it at the top of my list, it was  a decent and worth the time to watch.

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It’s Kind of a Funny Story

 Culture, Movies  Comments Off on It’s Kind of a Funny Story
Nov 062010
 

What’s a 16-year-old boy doing playing music and table tennis with adult psychiatric patients – on a school day? It’s kind of a funny story… It’s @5:00 AM on a Sunday in Brooklyn. Craig Gilner is bicycling up to the entrance of a mental health clinic; this bright 16-year-old is stressed out from the demands of being a teenager. Before his parents and younger sister are even awake, Craig checks himself into Argenon Hospital and is admitted by a psychiatrist. But the youth ward is temporarily closed – so he finds himself stuck in the adult ward. One of the patients, Bobby, soon becomes both Craig’s mentor and protege. Craig is also quickly drawn to another 16-year-old displaced to the adult ward, the sensitive Noelle, who just might make him forget his longtime unrequited crush Nia. With a minimum five days’ stay imposed on him by the adult ward’s staff psychiatrist Dr. Eden Minerva, Craig is sustained by friendships on both the inside and the outside as he learns more about life, love, and the pressures of growing up.

Genres: Comedy, Drama and Adaptation; Release Date: October 8th, 2010 (limited); MPAA Rating: PG-13 for mature thematic issues, sexual content, drug material and language.

Starring: Keir Gilchrist, Emma Roberts, Viola Davis, Lauren Graham, Jim Gaffigan

Directed by: Ryan Fleck, Anna Boden

We went to see this a couple of weeks ago at the movie theater. “It’s Kind of a Funny Story” is an aptly titled film. It’s just a story, and it’s kind of funny. It’s more drama than comedy, and although it was slow, they really did drag me into the story. It stars Keir Gilchrist as Craig, a teenager who thinks about killing himself and seeks help. He finds help at a psychiatric ward.

Is Zach Galifianakis a doctor or a patient? Like Robin Williams in the beginning of “Patch Adams”, he blurs the line well. Here he delivers the same off-beat humour that we have come to expect from him. I was also quite impressed with Emma Roberts who plays a love interest for our teenage hero. They were all well written characters, and I found it very appropriate that they kept Roberts’ reasons for being in the psych ward concealed.

Lay did not like the movie, but I’ll never have it at the top of my list, it was  a decent and worth the time to watch.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars6 Stars7 Stars8 Stars9 Stars10 Stars (1 votes, average: 7.00 out of 10)
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The Blind Side-A Movie Review

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Jun 182010
 

Michael Oher, a homeless African-American youngster from a broken home, is taken in by the Touhys, a well-to-do white family who help him fulfill his potential. At the same time, Oher’s presence in the Touhys’ lives leads them to some insightful self-discoveries of their own. Living in his new environment, the teen faces a completely different set of challenges to overcome. As a football player and student, Oher works hard and, with the help of his coaches and adopted family, becomes an All-American offensive left tackle.

Genres: Comedy, Drama, Adaptation, Biopic and Sports; Running Time: 2 hrs.; Release Date: November 20th, 2009 (wide); MPAA Rating: PG-13 for one scene involving brief violence, drug and sexual references.

Starring: Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw, Quinton Aaron, Lily Collins, Ray McKinnon

Directed by: John Lee Hancock

Lay and me watched this as a download a couple of weeks ago. I wanted to see it more than he did, and I enjoyed it more than he did.

The Blind Side tells us an inspiring story in the kindest way, which along with competent performances and good intentions, ends up bringing us a nice entertaining time.

The first thing I appreciated on The Blind Side is the absence of cheap sentimentality. Besides, the message from the movie is shown on a natural way, because it is filtered into the sober narrative.The Blind Side does not pretend to plunge us into the sordid reality of the North American social system, and it even finds moments of humor into the racist comments from some hateful characters.The main attraction for many people before watching the movie will undoubtedly be the acclaimed performance from Sandra Bullock, which made her win an Oscar.Did she really deserve it? I tend to think she did not, but I definitely enjoyed her work.

The problem with this film’s detractors is that they see this as more than the literal story of a rich Southern woman who helped a black youth with no hope for a bright future rise up and become an NCAA football star, and later a player with the Baltimore Ravens. I suppose this movie does fictionalize the true story a great deal and punch it up so that it is a quintessential “Feel-Good Hallmark Movie of the Year” (TM). Still, do not forget that it is based on a true story… it really happened. I think it is supposed to be an inspirational story for those with little hope of achieving big things with their lives; by the same token, it is also possible that “The Blind Side” became a book and movie because it was a rare occurrence, something that does not usually happen in this world.

In a big degree, Bullock repeats her classic routine of adorable mischievous, but on this occasion, she seasons it with a subtle intensity which brings weight and honesty to her character.I truly think this is one of the best performances from her career, and not only for the emotions she generates with her development, but also because she feels much more credible than the uncountable harebrained women she usually embodies in romantic comedies.

The fails I found on this movie is that some funny moments feel a bit forced, and that it turns a bit artificial near the end.

In summary, I think I can recommend The Blind Side with confidence, because it is a movie which fulfills with its intentions of inspiring, entertaining and even bringing us a slight lesson of humanity in order to appreciate everything we have a little more.

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Pirate Radio – A Movie Review

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May 162010
 

In the 1960s a group of 8 rogue DJs on a boat in the middle of the Northern Atlantic, played rock records and broke the law all for the love of music. The songs they played united and defined an entire generation and drove the British government crazy. By playing rock ‘n roll they were standing up against the British government who did everything in their power to shut them down.

Genres: Art/Foreign and Comedy; Running Time: 1 hr. 55 min.; Release Date: November 13th 2009 (wide); MPAA Rating: R for language, and some sexual content including brief nudity.

Starring: Philip Seymour Hoffman, Bill Nighy, Rhys Ifans, Nick Frost, Kenneth Branagh
Directed by: Richard Curtis

Richard Curtis’ first ‘non romantic comedy film’ is really another romantic comedy film- it’s just that the romantic bit gets swamped within 20 other sub-plots so you try and not notice.

The Boat That Rocked sees Carl (Tom Surridge) go aboard Radio Rock- a pirate radio station owned by Quentin (Bill Nighy) whose DJ’s (Phillip Semour Hoffman, Rhys Ifans, Nick Frost, Chris O’ Dowd, Rhys Darby, etc.) broadcast 24-hour rock and roll music to the UK. They are adored by the populace but hated by the government, including the Minister of Communications and his chief subordinate who aim to shut them down.

If that was the extent of the plot then it would probably be a 90 minute film. However the Boat That Rocked has so many little sub-plots- many seeming like excuses to put in another montage or cameo cast appearance that the time has ballooned out to 154mins and it does tell at times. Furthermore.

But these faults are more than made up for in the performances; all of which are good- and some are outstanding. Phillip Seymour Hoffman’s Count is a lovable character who approaches everything with great gusto, while Chris O’ Dowd’s Simple Simon has a wonderful part in the middle section of the movie which brings a little bit of emotion to what is a pretty emotionally vacant movie. Nick Frost is cheeky as Dr Dave and finally Rhys Darby- fresh from Flight of the Conchords- simply shines in his role as the unpopular and daggy Angus who nonetheless gets arguably the best line in the whole movie.

I have been wanting to see this movie since I saw the trailer for the very first time. We finally watched it as a download a couple of weeks ago. The plot sounded interesting and I was hoping to see a comedy that wasn’t as predictable and forced romantic as a lot of comedies are. I wasn’t disappointed. Sure, this isn’t the most profound story ever told, but I wanted to have fun, and this movie definitely gave it to me. Another bonus is the great soundtrack, which carries the whole movie. After leaving the cinema you will want to listen to the songs featured in this film, just so you can enjoy the feeling of it a little longer. This film is funny from the beginning to the end, and there were moments when I couldn’t stop laughing. If you want to see a feel-good movie with a plot that was, at least as far as I know, not used before, than this is the right film for you.

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Julie and Julia – A Movie Review

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Feb 222010
 

Click here to watch the trailer for this movie at Yahoo Movies.Based on two true stories, “Julie & Julia” intertwines the lives of two women who, though separated by time and space, are both at loose ends until they discover that with the right combination of passion, fearlessness and butter, anything is possible.

Genres: Comedy and Adaptation; Running Time: 2 hr. 3 min.; Release Date: August 7th, 2009 (wide); MPAA Rating: PG-13 for brief strong language and some sensuality.

Starring: Meryl Streep, Amy Adams, Stanley Tucci, Chris Messina, Jane Lynch

Directed by: Nora Ephron

I watched this as an Amazon On-Demand movie one evening last week while Lay was at work. He was not interested in seeing this movie, but I was. And I found myself enjoying the experience.

Nora Ephron likes to observe how two people meet and bond with each other, ultimately forming a relationship that we hope will transcend time, and like in her previous films, she manages to nuance both characters seamlessly and bind them in our eyes to a point where we can’t care for one without wondering what will happen to the other. It is a rare accomplishment.

The film is based on two true stories. First there’s the story of the world-renowned Julia Child, who wrote the American classic “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” It is the story of Julia’s arrival on France in 1949, how she learned to cook, and how she went about co-writing the book with two of her friends. The other story happens in 2002. It follows Julie Powell, a government worker who lives atop a Pizzeria with her husband, and who decides that to find some meaning in life she’ll cook all of Julia Child’s recipes in a maximum of one year, and write about the experience in a blog. The film seamlessly interweaves these two stories, with Julia’s life experiences going into her cookbook, and those experiences wafting through the years to Julie’s kitchen.

The film may seem, at first, unimpressive…and it is, to a point. It’s a biopic, and we must admit that lives are seldom as impressive as Hollywood makes them out to be, so don’t be expecting ingenious plot twists or the characters coming full circle at the end. The film portrays the life of America’s most beloved cook and of a woman following in her footsteps. Just that. But it is amazing how the lives of these completely different women are similar, even though they live in different centuries and countries. They’re both: happily married, they both experience an important move at the beginning of the film, both take up cooking to fill up an emptiness in their life and both harvest so much passion and art from what they cook; both are writers, but find almost the same hardships when looking for publishers, both have similar marital problems, and at the end they both understand how life works for them.

Ephron knows how to relate two characters. These two women have never met, but they’re so similar and share so much that we wonder whether they may be family. And notice how Julie adores and reveres Julia, even though she’s never met her, and how Julia is the motivation and spark behind Julie’s life even if she’s not aware of her existence. Meryl Streep as Julia Child takes over what could be an uninteresting story and injects it with glee and joy with a powerful and entrancing performance, an Oscar-worthy one. Amy Adams as Julie Powell is very good too, depicting a typical struggling American woman and bearing her heart for the audience. Her story is a bit uninvolving too, but her performance does wonders for what could otherwise be a stale film.

“Julie & Julia” has two seamlessly intertwined story lines and two superb leading ladies. The cinematography and editing are very well done, but not spectacular. The production design is very good, actually, especially on the Julia storyline, recreating bourgeois France in 1949 and seeping us into the charming and infectiously fun lifestyle she led.

It’s not the movie of the year, but Streep and Adams and outstanding, and all the supporting characters are excellent. The screen play is very interesting, and the two stories are woven together nicely. This is is a movie well worth watching.

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Extract – A Movie Review

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Feb 212010
 

Click to watch the trailer for Extract.Joel is one step away from selling his flavor extract factory and retiring to easy street when a freak workplace accident sets in motion a series of disasters that put his business and personal life in jeopardy.

Genres: Comedy; Running Time: 1 hr. 30 min.; Release Date: September 4th, 2009 (limited); MPAA Rating: R for language, sexual references and some drug use.

Starring: Jason Bateman, Mila Kunis, Kristen Wiig, Ben Affleck, J. K. Simmons

Directed by: Mike Judge

We watched this on DVD a couple of weeks ago, and it was reasonably good movie with several funny sub-plots. I watched this movie with Lay having no expectations whatsoever. I hadn’t seen the trailer and I didn’t know who was in it. The initial premise was interesting: a successful businessman in an odd industry wanting to sell up to be able to live a different life and spend more time with his wife.

With a few motion pictures and several television projects under his belt, Mike Judge has become the undisputed master of working man’s comedy. No matter the color of their, the characters created by Judge exist on the front-lines of American industry.  Judge is content not to tug the heartstrings or rely on frequent hilarity as long as he is able to build the impression that the people on screen are an honest reflection of the co-worker to your right or the relative on your left.

The cast Judge has assembled is very good. Jason Bateman continues to display his mastery of portraying the straight man; playing effortlessly against the eccentricities of his oddball co-workers and the other peculiar people surrounding him. The scene-stealers here, though, are Ben Affleck, Clifton Collins Jr., J.K. Simmons and David Koechner. Affleck submits a wonderful performance as a bartender who believes Xanax is the cure for everything (including the common cold). The role tackled by Collins Jr. is one dimensional on paper, but the actor’s performance provides the character with depth and humanity. J.K. Simmons appears to relish the opportunity to play Joel’s business partner and is given several killer lines to play with, while Koechner nails the part as the annoying, talkative, socially awkward neighbour. Mila Kunis (best known as the voice of Meg Griffin in Family Guy) is well-suited to the role of Cindy; she’s required to look ridiculously hot as she goes about her business of tricking the men she encounters, and she pulls it off. The music store scene is especially funny.

Judge places an interesting and funny film that doesn’t seem to be interested in finishing,or filling out the characters and/or situations of the story,and thus falls short of previous efforts(Office Space and Idiocracy). Practically every character besides Joel is left open-ended: the wife,the injured worker in question,the unctuous neighbor played by David Koechner and the grifter hottie. Certainly a quick comedy that plays for absurd events that mull out of mundane occurrences is probably going to have one-dimensional characters,but it still feels like this film was somewhat hurried. A little more exposition and maybe an awkwardly pinned ending might’ve improved the quality of this film.

Still,the lines and some of the performances–the guy who plays the stutlifyingly dumb young hustler hired to seduce Joel’s wife is particularly mint,complimenting Affleck’s inspired turn–make this movie easily enjoyable. Certainly no Oscar contenders here, but it was kind of a fun movie, and worth the time watching it.

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The Goods – A Movie Review

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Nov 252009
 

The_GoodsIn a desperate attempt to save his rapidly failing used car dealership, Ben Selleck hires a crack team of “car mercenaries” to ramp up sales during the Fourth of July weekend. Led by the fast-talking, foul-mouthed, self-assured Don “The Goods” Ready, the group has three days to sell over 200 cars. But as Don undertakes his newest mission, and quickly falls for the boss’s daughter Ivy, he realizes he’ll have to trust more than his cars and his crafty skills in deceit to make a success out of the daunting weekend.

Genres: Comedy; Release Date: April 24th, 2009

Starring: Jeremy Piven, Ving Rhames, David Koechner, Kathryn Hahn, Tony Hale

Directed by: Neal Brennan

Lay and I watched this movie last Friday night. I didn’t have high expectations, so I was OK with this movie. This is a comedy with an ensemble cast of actors featured in numerous Ferrell/McKay movies with plenty of good-natured humorous satire of needless prejudices that will be familiar to anyone who has watched Chappelle’s Show and was able to grasp the satire behind it. Rather than setting up one big gag for the end, the movie has countless visual jokes, hidden background details and subtexts, and quotable lines of funny dialogue. While not as good, it’s similar to Police Academy or Caddyshack. You have to accept for what it is…a big satire layering every possible joke they can fit in. There were a few laugh out loud moments, and lots of mild humor throughout. The characters played their parts well. It’s worth renting.

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