The Tears Continue for Our Once Great Nation

 Congress, Crime, Politics, Presidency, Society, War  Comments Off on The Tears Continue for Our Once Great Nation
Jul 022008
 

The New York Times is reporting that military trainers who came to Guantanamo Bay in December 2002 based an interrogation class on a chart showing various “coercive” techniques for use on prisoners. What the trainers did not reveal, and may not have known, was that their chart had been copied an Air Force study of Chinese Communist techniques used during the Korean War to obtain false confessions from American prisoners.

The 1957 article from which the chart was copied was entitled “Communist Attempts to Elicit False Confessions From Air Force Prisoners of War” and written by Albert D. Biderman, a sociologist then working for the Air Force, who died in 2003. Mr. Biderman had interviewed American prisoners returning from North Korea, some of whom had been filmed by their Chinese interrogators confessing to germ warfare and other atrocities.

Senator Carl Levin, head of the Senate Armed Services Committee said, “What makes this document doubly stunning is that these were techniques to get false confessions. People say we need intelligence, and we do. But we don’t need false intelligence.” (Duhh)

Of course, when has the Bush administration really cared about getting intelligence. They just make up what they need. But picture this, George, Condi, and Dick sitting around the Oval Office having coffee laughing and having a good ole time coming up with ways that prisoners can be tortured for their fun and amusement. Who wants to bet me that Dick Cheney has watched videos of some of the “interrogations.” (Maybe even alone at home in the dark doing the dirty.)

How sad we have become, but of course the right-wing will insist that, “It’s not torture…it was when the commies did it to our soldiers, but it’s not now when we do it to Arabs, that’s different.”

Two Inauspicious Anniversaries Today

 Congress, Politics, Presidency  Comments Off on Two Inauspicious Anniversaries Today
Jan 112008
 

Orange really isn’t my color, but I did find one orange and white stripped shirt in my closet to wear today. So why would it be important to wear orange today? January 11 six years ago was the first day prisoners arrived at Guantanamo Bay, beginning what will go down in history as one of America’s darkest times. To help call for an end to the use of places like Guantanamo, the American Civil Liberties Union has asked everyone to wear orange today (you know, like prison jump suit orange) to acknowledge the existence of such places.

Fortunately, legislation has been introduced in Congress that would close the detention facility and restore due process rights to those being held at Guantanamo. Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) introduced S. 1469, the Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility Closure Act of 2007. The bill requires the president to close the facility within 120 days of enactment – during which time detainees would be charged and sent to either the United States Disciplinary Barracks at Ft. Leavenworth, KS, or transferred to another country that will not torture or abuse them.

I would ask you to take a few minutes and write a letter to your Congressional Representatives and encourage to sign on in support of S. 1469.

It was January 10 last year that King George announced his plans for the troop surge in Iraq. Republican candidates, turncoat Joe Lieberman, and all the Fox News pundits are proclaiming the surge a success because violence is down somewhat in Iraq. Certainly it is true that violence is down, but it does not make the surge a success.

As I reviewed George’s speech (he so doesn’t represent me that I refuse to refer to him as President…he does not deserve to be included in the ranks of the men that have that moniker), I realized the purpose of the surge was to reduce violence so that the Iraqi government could make progress on the many political issues facing the country. It was to provide an atmosphere in which the Iraqi government would agree on issues including oil revenue sharing, de-Baathification, federalism, and more. There has been absolutely no progress within the Iraqi government on these issues during the past year.

I’m glad violence is down, but we are no closer to being able to reduce troop levels (and expenditures) than we were a year ago, and the current situation is unsustainable.

I Need to Watch Boston Legal More Often

 Congress, Constitution, Culture, Politics, Television, War  Comments Off on I Need to Watch Boston Legal More Often
May 142007
 

The few time’s I’ve watched Boston Legal, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed it, but for some reason it’s never made my “must watch” list. After seeing this, I think I have to set the Tivo to record it. What a great statement.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DG-54fmn97c

Waterboard Rumsfeld?

 Constitution, Corruption, Crime, Politics, Presidency, Society, War  Comments Off on Waterboard Rumsfeld?
Nov 102006
 

If he has nothing to hide…

Just days after his resignation, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld is about to face more repercussions for his involvement in the troubled wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. New legal documents, to be filed next week with Germany’s top prosecutor, will seek a criminal investigation and prosecution of Rumsfeld, along with Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, former CIA director George Tenet and other senior U.S. civilian and military officers, for their alleged roles in abuses committed at Iraq’s Abu Ghraib prison and at the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Hey, maybe the Germans can try that cute little trick that Bush’s CIA did in Italy. Just swoop in and steal people off the street of a NATO ally, then ship them out of the country to be tortured. I mean, after all, America is the beacon of hope in the world and we set the standard for decency. Hell, we are decency country-ified. Anything we do is per se humane and legal. So why couldn’t the Germans use the same tactics on us? I understand war criminals don’t get the same rights as real people anyway – you know, like habeas corpus or the Geneva Conventions – so no harm no foul.

We are at war, you know.

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