Aug 072007
 

Well, S.1927, An Act To Amend The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 passed the Senate and House, with a bunch of weak kneed Democrats rushing to its support.

Unfortunately I’m not surprised to find that Florida Senator Bill Nelson has voted in favor of the amendment. The Senator has consistently cast votes hostile to the Constitution and with the Bush Administration. I can only guess he’s been promised a bed in the bunker during the coming coup. Unfortunately, he’s not up for reelection until 2012, but I have decided he is nothing more than a Republican in sheep’s clothing. He’s very quiet about it, but seems to very consistently vote to support the Administration.

I was also surprised to see that Jim Webb, the newly elected Senator from Virginia, had voted for the amendment. I thought he had a bit more backbone.

The last vestiges of democratic rule are slipping away. Of all the things in the bill, it gives this unbridled power to Alberto Gonzales…a man who has called the Constitution, “a quaint document.” This is a man who wouldn’t know the truth if it bit him in the ass, and he can surveil any person he wants to. Do you honestly believe this administration will use this authority only for good?

Jan 242007
 

Here is the Democratic response to the State of the Union Address as delivered by Freshman Senator Jim Webb (D-VA). Extremely well written, consise and delivered perfectly.

This is the text prepared for delivery by Sen. Jim Webb as the Democratic response to the president’s State of the Union speech Tuesday night.

Good evening.

I’m Senator Jim Webb, from Virginia, where this year we will celebrate the 400th anniversary of the settlement of Jamestown – an event that marked the first step in the long journey that has made us the greatest and most prosperous nation on earth.

It would not be possible in this short amount of time to actually rebut the President’s message, nor would it be useful. Let me simply say that we in the Democratic Party hope that this administration is serious about improving education and healthcare for all Americans, and addressing such domestic priorities as restoring the vitality of New Orleans.

Further, this is the seventh time the President has mentioned energy independence in his state of the union message, but for the first time this exchange is taking place in a Congress led by the Democratic Party. We are looking for affirmative solutions that will strengthen our nation by freeing us from our dependence on foreign oil, and spurring a wave of entrepreneurial growth in the form of alternate energy programs. We look forward to working with the President and his party to bring about these changes.

There are two areas where our respective parties have largely stood in contradiction, and I want to take a few minutes to address them tonight.

The first relates to how we see the health of our economy – how we measure it, and how we ensure that its benefits are properly shared among all Americans. The second regards our foreign policy – how we might bring the war in Iraq to a proper conclusion that will also allow us to continue to fight the war against international terrorism, and to address other strategic concerns that our country faces around the world.

When one looks at the health of our economy, it’s almost as if we are living in two different countries. Some say that things have never been better.          Continue reading »