Movie Review – Gone Girl

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Oct 202014
 

Gone Girl Movie PosterOn the occasion of his fifth wedding anniversary, Nick Dunne reports that his wife, Amy, has gone missing. Under pressure from the police and a growing media frenzy, Nick’s portrait of a blissful union begins to crumble. Soon his lies, deceits and strange behavior have everyone asking the same dark question: Did Nick Dunne kill his wife?

Rating: 9.3/10 (238 votes)
Director: David Fincher
Writer: Gillian Flynn (screenplay), Gillian Flynn (novel)
Stars: Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike, Neil Patrick Harris, Tyler Perry
Runtime: 149 min
Rated: R
Genre: Drama, Mystery, Thriller
Released: 03 Oct 2014

Well, this one deserves the hype. Me and Lay went to watch this one last night at the AMC Theater in Brandon. The theater wasn’t packed, but there was a sizable crowd, which was, for a change, reasonably quiet.

David Fincher has crafted, in his clear-cut no-nonsense style, a powerful mystery-thriller that would likely win kudos from Hitchcock. I have never read the book, nor any Gillian Flynn books, but she crafted a great story, and executed the screenplay very well.  Continue reading »

The Social Network – A Movie Review

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Dec 132010
 

On a fall night in 2003, Harvard undergrad and computer programming genius Mark Zuckerberg sits down at his computer and heatedly begins working on a new idea. In a fury of blogging and programming, what begins in his dorm room soon becomes a global social network and a revolution in communication. A mere six years and 500 million friends later, Mark Zuckerberg is the youngest billionaire in history, but for this entrepreneur, success leads to both personal and legal complications.

Genres: Drama and Biopic; Running Time: 2 hr.; Release Date: October 1st 2010 (wide); MPAA Rating: PG 13 for sexual content, drug and alcohol use and language.

Starring: Jesse Eisenberg, Justin Timberlake, Andrew Garfield, Joseph Mazzello, Armie Hammer

Directed by: David Fincher

I went to see this movie quite a while back at the theater. I took a Friday off, and went in the afternoon. I love to do that. I don’t know why, but seeing a film on a weekday afternoon gives me a real sense of “playing hooky.”

This film which shouldn’t work, but it does, and very well. A story centred on a teenager who becomes the world’s youngest billionaire, a web site that reaches a million users in two years, and a cast of real life characters with names like Zuckerberg and Winklevoss just shouldn’t be possible. A convoluted tale of raw conflict on the origins of a new type of web site should not lend itself to an expensive movie as opposed to a television documentary. It succeeds because it is not about the technology but about creativity and conflict and about friendship and betrayal. It succeeds because of a magical combination of accomplished direction, scintillating dialogue and superb acting.

The direction comes from David Fincher who has had variable success, all the way from “Alien 3″ to Se7en”, but here he is right on form with a flashy, but tightly structured, presentation that never fails to command your attention and interest. The all-important script is courtesy of Aaron Sorkin who gave us “The West Wing” – the best television series ever – and yet apparently does not do social networking.

At the heart of the movie is a great performance from Jesse Eisenberg as the 19 year old Harvard student Mark Zuckerberg, the genius behind “The Facebook” (the social network), the unsympathetic anti-hero of the adventure, a borderline sociopath variously described by women characters as “an asshole” and someone “just trying so hard to be” one. Andrew Garfield is excellent as Zuckerberg’s Harvard roommate and co-founder of the site Eduardo Savarin; thanks to the wonders of CGI, Arnie Hammer manages to be terrific as both the twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss; while singer Justin Timberlake is a revelation as the Napster founder Sean Parker. This is a testosterone-charged fable with room for women only in minor support roles – ironic in that getting girls was the impetus for the Facebook project.

I would recommend this movie.
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars6 Stars7 Stars8 Stars9 Stars10 Stars (1 votes, average: 9.00 out of 10)
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Se7en – A Movie Review

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Jul 252008
 

Movie Poster for Se7enLt. William Somerset, a burnt-out veteran cop, is on the brink of retirement. Forced to train his ambitious and eager replacement, Somerset is teamed with Detective David Mills on an investigation that draws these disparate cops deeper and deeper into the twisted world of a cunning and meticulous criminal. He is methodical, exacting and grotesquely creative. He is known as John Doe and he is the most vicious serial killer alive, fashioning murders based on the seven deadly sins. As each new victim is discovered, the detectives must combine their collective experiences to track the trail of a killer bent on seeking attrition for society’s sins.

Genres: Drama, Thriller and Crime/Gangster; Running Time: 2 hrs. 5 min.; Release Date: September 22nd, 1995; MPAA Rating: R for grisly afterviews of horrific and bizarre killings, and for strong language.

Starring: Morgan Freeman, Brad Pitt, Gwyneth Paltrow, R. Lee Ermey, Richard Roundtree, Kevin Spacey

Directed by: David Fincher

This was a movie we watched weekend before last. It was better than I expected. I started watching this movie and i couldn’t stop until it was over. This gritty film about a serial killer who is doling out punishments according to The Seven Deadly Sins, and leaving a trail of crumbs that lead two police officers to a final act that will leave you stunned with disbelief. What a great storyline and the acting was pretty good. Freeman played a great cop and an extremely creepy Kevin Spacey is an exceptional demented bad guy. Brad Pitt is much younger then, and some inexperience comes through, but overall he handles the part reasonably well. The ending of this movie will shock you, probably my favorite ending of any movie and it’s not often you see Hollywood end a movie like this. Such a dark movie that it will leave you thinking about it for days after the movie. You have to see this one.

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Zodiac

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Aug 022007
 

ZodiacA serial killer in the San Francisco Bay Area taunts police with his letters and cryptic messages. We follow the investigators and reporters in this lightly fictionalized account of the true 1970’s case as they search for the murderer, becoming obsessed with the case. Based on Robert Graysmith’s book, the movie’s focus is the lives and careers of the detectives and newspaper people.

Director
David Fincher

Genre
Crime / Drama / Thriller

Cast
Jake Gyllenhaal, Mark Ruffalo, Anthony Edwards, Robert Downey Jr., Brian Cox, John Carroll Lynch, Richmond Arquette, Bob Stephenson, John Lacy, Chloë Sevigny, Ed Setrakian, John Getz, John Terry, Candy Clark, Elias Koteas

Usually when a film gets made about a media grabbing unsolved crime, the resulting movie tends to be overtly sensational and at only remotely connected to what really happened. But the director has given us a well argued thesis on the possible identity of the Zodiac. While there are some very intense scenes, Fincher takes a somewhat unexpected approach on the subject. All of the killings take place pretty early on in the movie, with the bulk of the story centering on the actual investigation into the killer by both the cops and a cartoonist who becomes obsessed with the case. In fact, the depictions of the murders are done in a manner that is fairly reverent towards the victims while still conveying the cruelty of them.

Some people may find themselves disappointed by this two and a half hour epic if they go in expecting the usual serial killer fare. But it’s a must see for anybody who likes a good detective story.

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